Tomato Hornworm












The five-spotted hawkmoth (Manduca quinquemaculata) is a brown and gray hawk moth of the Sphingidae family. The caterpillar, often referred to as the tomato hornworm, can be a major pest in gardens. Tomato hornworms are closely related to (and sometimes confused with) the tobacco hornworm (Manduca sexta). This confusion arises because caterpillars of both species feed on the foliage of various plants from the family Solanaceae, so either species can be found on tobacco or tomato leaves, and the plant on which the caterpillar is found does not indicate its species. The larvae of these species can be distinguished by their lateral markings: tomato hornworms have eight V-shaped markings while tobacco hornworms have seven diagonal lines.Furthermore, the caterpillars can be distinguished from the larval stage onwards by the color of the horns on their back ends: M. quinquemaculata caterpillars have black horns, while M. sexta caterpillars have red horns. The moths can be distinguished by the number of spots on their abdomens, with M. quinquemaculata having, as its name suggests, 

Habitat M. quinquemaculata is found throughout the United States, northwestern Mexico, and even southern Canada, but is less frequently found throughout the Great Plains and the southeas

Tomato hornworms are known to eat various plants from the family Solanaceae, commonly feeding on tomatoeggplantpeppertobaccomoonflowers and potato. Accordingly, they are often found on defoliated tomato plants, the caterpillar clinging to the underside of a branch near the trunk. They are difficult to spot due to their green coloration. Tomato hornworms fluoresce differently from tomato leaves. Using an ultraviolet light source of 375nm and viewed behind a blue-blocking filter (yellow or amber filter), a tomato hornworm fluoresces in bright green while a tomato leaf appears deep red/amber. This sharp color contrast helps gardeners locate tomato hornworms at night. They can be reduced by planting marigold flowers around these plants.


all Photos by Christopher Stokes / © Christopher Stokes 2012
Share this Photo to someone's Facebook Wall

to view a larger size of this picture just click on the picture. 
these make Great Wallpaper for your Desktop or Cell Phone to use this as your wallpaper right click on the pictures and SAVE AS then goto where you saved the picture and right click on it and SET AS DESKTOP WALLPAPER if that doesn't work try this goto my documents the goto downloads in that folder you will find the Pictures you saved. all pictures are for sale. 

Visit us on Facebook

Todays Videos

My Other Blogs

a Special Thanks gos to all my friends at Indiana Native Plant and Wildflower Society (INPAWS)  http://www.inpaws.org 
and the Facebook group Indiana Native Plant and Wildflower Society (INPAWS)

Thank you for viewing my Photos :)